Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ

 

Q:  How do I apply Young Hormones? How do I get the most out of the products?

A:  Get this great handout on those questions, and more:

 

Q:  I've seen skin creams with hormones for less money. Why the difference?

A:  The answer is in multiple parts:

First, our base cream is an eloquent, superior, botanical cream made from all natural ingredients, which ensures its non-sticky, non-greasy texture. It is specially formulated to be absorbed quickly into the skin, and not just sit on top.  It costs more to make than other base creams.

Second - and most importantly - our hormone ingredients are bioidentical to human hormones, USP Grade, made in America, made from organic (non-GMO) sources, and delivered in an airless pump bottle to ensure freshness.  All of those qualities add to the cost of creating such outstanding products.

Third, our products in airless pump bottles are fairly concentrated, and we provide a generous amount of product.  A typical application of our product is two pumps, and the bottle contains enough for about 200 pumps. One bottle typically lasts two to four months.

Fourth, most other products on the market do not offer progesterone and estrogen in one product, which means in order to obtain the proper combination of the two, you'd have to buy two different products.  With Young Hormones' Hormone Heaven and Hormone Support, Estrogen and Progesterone are provided together at the right ratios.

 

Q:  You say your bioidentical hormone supplements are USP grade. What does USP mean?

A:  USP defined: The United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Incorporated, (USP) is a scientific nonprofit organization that sets standards for the identity, strength, quality, and purity of medicines, food ingredients, and dietary supplements. USP Grade means that a product meets all of the requirements as contained in the USP monograph for that product and is manufactured in a CGMP compliant facility. CGMP refers to the Current Good Manufacturing Practice regulations enforced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). CGMPs provide for systems that assure proper design, monitoring, and control of manufacturing processes and facilities. If there is no USP monograph, a material cannot be labeled as USP Grade.

 

Q:  Do bioidentical Estrogens work better than the prescription Premarin? What's wrong with Premarin?

A:  The FDA says that there is no definitive proof that bioidentical Estrogens are actually superior to Premarin (and other patented "Estrogens").  So, we can't say that bioidentical hormones are better for you.  You have to decide for yourself what you want to put in your body - bioidentical Estrogens that are exactly same as the ones your body makes, or conjugated estrogens isolated from the urine of pregnant mares.  Here's what PETA says on their website: "The estrogen-replacement drug Premarin, prescribed to menopausal women, is made from horse urine; in fact, the drug’s name is short for PREgnant MARes’ urINe. About 750,000 mares are impregnated each year for the sole purpose of collecting their estrogen-rich urine. Tied in small stalls, unable to move either backwards, forwards, or sideways or lie down comfortably, they stand with sacks strapped to their groins for months on end. In order to make the urine more concentrated, their water intake is restricted, so the horses are constantly thirsty. The foals are considered “byproducts,” and most are fattened up, slaughtered, and sold for horse meat or turned into dog food."

 

Q:  If using small amounts of skin cream with bioidentical hormones can be good for the average woman, then would large amounts be even better?

A:  The short answer is no.  We are aware that many people suggest that mega doses of certain vitamins and minerals can be beneficial, i.e., more is better!  Not so with human hormones.  Having too high of hormones can be just as bad as having too low of hormones.  Many women have increased their hormone levels too high and ended up with the same - or worse  - symptoms as before they started.  The whole idea of supplementing hormones is to try to get the levels close to where they are in an average 30-year-old woman - not above that.  Too much is not a good thing.  The key is balancing.

 

 

 

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